Descargar aplicación UNESCO
Acerca

El ecosistema del diseño en México. Resumen ejecutivo.

Mexico City thrives through its design; a kaleidoscopic showcase of products, efforts and processes that flourishes all over the city. Branded as CDMX in 2014 as an attempt to change its image and boost its international presence, this city has proven to be a powerful example for the potential of design as a democratic process .

As the vibrant center of the political, cultural and economic life of Mexico, CDMX is also the country’s biggest and most dynamic urban center. While its surface is distributed in only 0.08% of Mexico’s territory, the city hosts about 8.9 million inhabitants and 7.5% of the overall population of the country. Consolidated as one of the most important financial and cultural centers in the American continent, it contributes to 16% of the country’s GDP and holds the most important and diverse concentration of cultural activities and infrastructure in Mexico. All these indicators, combined with the vast number of multidisciplinary festivals, conventions and fairs that take place year-round in the city have built an important momentum for creative tourism and have drawn the attention of the international artistic community.

Mexico City’s design is constantly shaped by its status as a megalopolis: an urban area comprised of 60 municipalities belonging to adjacent states, adding up to a total of 20 million people having direct influence over its dynamics and making it one of the most challenging and diverse metropolises in the world. Mexico City is the first city in the world to have a crowdsourced Constitution, a process that has strengthened the city’s centripetal forces of engagement. The presence of a increasing citizen participation and a powerful urban creativity is constantly shaping heritage, neighborhoods and communities in their developments. Every year, this city receives over 13 million visitors and constantly welcomes a full spectrum of visitors from national migration to important exiled communities, artists and executives.

Creative Industries have been identified as a fundamental sector in the country’s economy, just below manufacturing, petroleum and tourism. In this sense, Mexico’s growth has been shifting towards the consolidation of its creative economy in response to the ways these industries invigorate the interactions among economic forces. The dimension of the creative economy in Mexico has been estimated by numerous actors and a multiplicity of methodologies. For example, the Culture Satellite Account of Mexico calculates that 2.7% of the national GDP is generated by the cultural sector, while the National Institute for Competitiveness has a higher estimation of 4.5% of the national GDP.

It is important to acknowledge that Mexico has one of the biggest informal economies in the world, estimated to generate around 25% of the national GDP and to employ roughly the 57% of the total workforce. Although the increasing role of the informal economy escapes official statistics, we must acknowledge that its role in Mexico has a tremendous impact on the country’s overall economic activity. In this sense, Ernesto Piedras proposes an alternative approach in which the value of the informal economy is added to the computation of the Creative Economy, and suggests a final share of 7.3% of the national GDP produced by the Creative Industries.

While acknowledging the economic complexities that entail being a megalopolis and addressing the challenges of informal labor conditions, we must also be able to recognize and efficiently measure the intensity of both the creative economy and the design sector. Efforts to quantify the role and impact of the Creative Industries in Mexico City only began taking shape in 2010. A long path awaits until a common conceptualization and recognition of the creative economic sector in Mexico City is developed and achieved.

Creative Industries in Mexico City employ 308,739 people, equivalent to 8.08% of the total economically active population, and produce a total turnover of $915,742 million USD. It is estimated that the Creative Economy represents 5.43% of the city’s GDP, yet the percentage goes up to 8.92% when taking into account the shadow economy. The design environment in Mexico City is diverse and rich; there are 1,789 registered economic units in Mexico City that generate 41,208 jobs and produce a total turnover of $138.855 million USD. Moreover, the sector is on the rise as in 2016 marked more than 40,000 students enrolled in design undergraduate and graduate programs in 60 Universities city-wide.

Either in spite of or due to this context, we require a broader definition of design that includes a number of processes and disciplines that shape and enrich the quality of our living environment as , once again, the panorama of Mexico City’s design business is not reflective of its real force. The 2018 designation of Mexico City as a “City of Design” and as a “World Design Capital” in the Unesco Creative City Network will hopefully shift the public’s perception of design from an alien entity to an accessible and participatory process.

Creative Industries in Mexico City represent a unique opportunity to all, as they propel an equal and integral development for citizens and communities through the positive externalities and synergy that they may have with other sectors of the economy and social life. Nonetheless, the shared role of informal economy is also on the rise. Informal economy is both a challenge and an opportunity in a city as complex as Mexico City. Once a creative sector is recognized in its amplitude, it is empowered to tackle greater problems.

Mexico City’s revisited advocacy for design and creative policy is a strategic key to advance common strategies that address the city’s challenges and opportunities in an innovative, human centered, and sustainable manner.

By expanding the horizon of a human centered design process that thrives to be multidisciplinary and of a common understanding, Mexico City’s Government, in conjunction with the City’s local design ecosystem, intends to open up the conversation about CDMX’s potential as a Design City. Strengthening both the professional and the independent creative networks, and accentuating the value of artistic work will only be possible with a renewed acknowledgement of creativity as a fundamental economic, social, cultural and political part of the urban realm.

"Censo de Población y Vivienda 2010", Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI).

“Enero - Diciembre 2015”, Secretaría de Turismo (SECTUR), February 2016.

Ernesto Piedras, “¿Por qué en México despreciamos el poder de las industrias creativas?”, interview by Zacarías Ramírez Tamayo, Últimas Noticias, Forbes México, 5 mayo 2017, https://www.forbes.com.mx/la-cultura-riqueza-mal-vista/.

«Cuenta satélite de la Cultura en México 2012», Sistema de Cuentas Nacionales de México, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI), 2012.

Instituto Mexicano para la Competitividad, A.C., Industrias Creativas & Obra Protegida: Informalidad, redes ilegales, crecimiento de la industria & competitividad en México, (IMCO, 2015), 7, https://imco.org.mx/wp-content...

Ernesto Piedras Frías, Economía y Cultura en la Ciudad de México, Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), 2010

Ibid

Secretaría de Cultura de la Ciudad de México, Programa de Fomento y Desarrollo Cultural 2014-2018, Ciudad de México, 2014.

Piedras, op. cit.

Estimated based in the North American Industrial Classification System (SCIAN) under ‘Diseño Especializado’, “Censo Económico 2014”, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI).

“Anuarios Estadísticos de Educación Superior: ciclo escolar 2015-2016”, Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), 2016, http://www.anuies.mx/informaci...

La Ciudad de México prospera mediante su diseño; un escaparate caleidoscópico de productos, esfuerzos y procesos que florece por toda la ciudad que, etiquetada como CDMX en 2014 en un intento por impulsar su imagen y presencia internacional, ha demostrado ser un ejercicio y mensaje poderoso por sí misma al posicionar el diseño para todos y hacia todos.

La CDMX, centro efervescente de la vida política, cultural y económica de México, es también el centro urbano más grande y dinámico del país. Si bien su superficie ocupa sólo el 0.08% del territorio de México (INEGI, 2010), esta ciudad es hogar de 8.9 millones de habitantes, 7.5% de la población total del país. Se consolidó como uno de los centros financieros y culturales más importantes de América, y contribuye al 16% del PIB del país, además de que alberga la concentración de oferta e infraestructura culturales más importante y diversa de México. Todos estos indicadores, junto con el gran número de festivales multidisciplinarios, convenciones y “expos” que se llevan a cabo durante todo el año en la ciudad, han llamado la atención de la comunidad artística internacional. Algunos de estos eventos de fama mundial son: Design Week México, Abierto Mexicano de Diseño, Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Show, La Lonja Mercantil, Mextrópoli, Zona Maco, Habitat Expo, entre otros.

El diseño de la Ciudad de México se moldea constantemente gracias a su condición de megalópolis: un área urbana compuesta de 60 municipios que pertenecen a sus estados colindantes, con lo que suma un total de 22 millones de personas que tienen influencia directa sobre su dinámica y la vuelven una de las metrópolis más desafiantes y diversas del mundo. La Ciudad de México es la primera en el mundo en contar con una Constitución realizada mediante participación abierta, un proceso que ha fortalecido las fuerzas centrípetas de participación de la ciudad. La presencia de una participación ciudadana y una creatividad urbana poderosa moldea constantemente el patrimonio, las colonias y las comunidades en su desarrollo. Cada año, esta ciudad recibe a más de 11 millones de visitantes extranjeros y constantemente acoge a un espectro completo de público diverso: desde migración nacional hasta importantes comunidades de exiliados, artistas y ejecutivos.

Se ha identificado a las industrias creativas como un sector fundamental de la economía del país, justo debajo de la manufactura, el petróleo y el turismo (Piedras, 2017). En este sentido, el crecimiento de México ha estado cambiando hacia la consolidación de su economía creativa como respuesta a las formas en que estas industrias dinamizan las interacciones entre las fuerzas económicas. La dimensión de la economía creativa en México ha sido calculada por numerosos actores y múltiples metodologías, por ejemplo, la Cuenta Satélite de la Cultura en México estima que 2.7% del PIB nacional es generado por el sector cultural (Sistema de Cuentas Nacionales de México, 2012), mientras que el Instituto Mexicano para la Competitividad hace un cálculo mayor de 4.5% del PIB nacional (IMCO, 2014).

Es importante reconocer que México tiene una de las mayores economías informales del mundo; se calcula que ésta genera alrededor del 25% del PIB nacional y emplea aproximadamente al 57% del total de la fuerza laboral. Aunque el papel creciente de la economía informal escapa a las estadísticas oficiales, no hay que subestimarlo, pues la participación de la economía informal en México tiene un impacto tremendo sobre la dinámica general de la actividad económica. En este sentido, Ernesto Piedras propone un enfoque alternativo en que el valor de la economía informal ser añade al cómputo de la Economía Creativa, y sugiere una cuota final del 7.3% del PIB nacional producido por las Industrias Creativas (Piedras, 2010).

Reconociendo las complejidades económicas que conlleva ser una megalópolis, así como sus condiciones de trabajo informal, consideramos que la intensidad de la economía creativa y el sector del diseño no se está reconociendo ni midiendo del todo. Algunos esfuerzos por cuantificar el papel e impacto de las Industrias Creativas en la Ciudad de México apenas iniciaron en 2010. Espera un largo camino hasta que desarrollemos y logremos una conceptualización y un reconocimiento comunes del sector económico creativo en la Ciudad de México.

Las Industrias Creativas en la Ciudad de México emplean a 308,739 personas, el 8.08% del total de la población económicamente activa, y producen un volumen de negocios total de $915,742 millones USD. Se estima que la Economía Creativa representa el 5.43% del PIB de la ciudad, aunque si se toma en cuenta la economía secundaria, el porcentaje sube a 8.92% (Piedras, 2010). El entorno del diseño en la Ciudad de México es diverso y rico. En lo que se refiere al negocio del diseño, hay 1,789 unidades económicas registradas en la Ciudad de México, que generan 41,208 empleos y producen un volumen de negocios total de $138.855 millones USD (INEGI, 2014). Además, el sector está al alza: el año pasado había más de 40,000 estudiantes inscritos en programas universitarios y de posgrado de diseño en 60 universidades (ANUIES, 2016).

A pesar de o debido a este contexto, dicho esfuerzo sugiere una definición más amplia del diseño, que incluye varios procesos y áreas multidisciplinarios que moldean y enriquecen la calidad del ambiente en que vivimos, aunque, una vez más, el panorama del negocio del diseño en la Ciudad de México sigue disminuido de su fuerza real. Esperamos que la designación de la Ciudad de México como Capital Mundial del Diseño en 2018 cambie la percepción del público, de que el diseño es una entidad ajena a un proceso alcanzable y participativo.

El Laboratorio para la Ciudad, la Oficina Creativa de la Ciudad de México, ha liderado esfuerzos importantes hacia la cuantificación de las Industrias Creativas. De hecho, el establecimiento de la oficina es en sí un punto de ruptura en el entendimiento y enfoque del gobierno respecto de la creatividad y el diseño. Uno de sus varios experimentos, el coloquio internacional Poder Hacer, inauguró un espacio para concebir ciudades creativas mediante el intercambio de ideas y experiencias con expertos en creatividad y ciudadanía. Además, Sondeo Creativo fue una encuesta experimental pionera diseñada para medir los aspectos cuantitativos y cualitativos de la Economía Creativa en la Ciudad de México. Haciendo hincapié sobre todo en el fortalecimiento de las redes sociales y profesionales, este primer análisis delineó implicaciones importantes para la política pública en relación con los agentes creativos en la ciudad.

Las Industrias Creativas en la Ciudad de México representan una oportunidad única para todos, a medida que impulsan un desarrollo equitativo e integral para ciudadanos y comunidades mediante las externalidades y sinergia positivas que podrían tener con otros sectores de la economía y la vida social. Sin embargo, el papel compartido de la economía informal también está en aumento. Ésta es tanto un desafío como una oportunidad en una ciudad tan compleja como la Ciudad de México: no es sino hasta que se reconoce a un sector creativo en su amplitud que éste es empoderado para atacar problemas mayores.

El apoyo replanteado al diseño y la política creativa de la Ciudad de México es una clave estratégica para promover estrategias comunes que aborden los retos y las oportunidades de la ciudad de una forma innovadora, centrada en los humanos y sustentable.

Al expandir el horizonte de un proceso de diseño centrado en los humanos que prospere para ser multidisciplinario y de entendimiento común, el Gobierno de la Ciudad de México, en articulación con el ecosistema de diseño local, pretende abrir el diálogo sobre el potencial de la CDMX como Ciudad de Diseño. Fortalecer la red creativa profesional y ciudadana y añadir valor al trabajo artístico sólo será posible con un reconocimiento y recepción de la creatividad como parte económica, social, cultural y política fundamental del ámbito urbano.

"Censo de Población y Vivienda 2010", Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI).

“Enero - Diciembre 2015”, Secretaría de Turismo (SECTUR), February 2016.

Ernesto Piedras, “¿Por qué en México despreciamos el poder de las industrias creativas?”, interview by Zacarías Ramírez Tamayo, Últimas Noticias, Forbes México, 5 mayo 2017, https://www.forbes.com.mx/la-cultura-riqueza-mal-vista/.

«Cuenta satélite de la Cultura en México 2012», Sistema de Cuentas Nacionales de México, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI), 2012.

Instituto Mexicano para la Competitividad, A.C., Industrias Creativas & Obra Protegida: Informalidad, redes ilegales, crecimiento de la industria & competitividad en México, (IMCO, 2015), 7, https://imco.org.mx/wp-content...

Ernesto Piedras Frías, Economía y Cultura en la Ciudad de México, Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), 2010

Ibid

Secretaría de Cultura de la Ciudad de México, Programa de Fomento y Desarrollo Cultural 2014-2018, Ciudad de México, 2014.

Piedras, op. cit.

Estimated based in the North American Industrial Classification System (SCIAN) under ‘Diseño Especializado’, “Censo Económico 2014”, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI).

“Anuarios Estadísticos de Educación Superior: ciclo escolar 2015-2016”, Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), 2016, http://www.anuies.mx/informaci...